Final Call for “Cover Diagnosis” Survey Participation

Hi – This is a final call for inputs for the survey I posted a while back – please consider responding before Sunday so I can compile results.

This survey is about Cover Diagnoses – those of you with 2 diagnosis. If you have a diagnosis for ANY Dissociative Disorder EXCEPT PTSD and a second diagnosis (such as PTSD, Bipolar, Depression, etc.), do you use the second diagnosis as a cover to avoid revealing the Dissociative Disorder diagnosis? I want to explore how/when/why/why not we decide to share our diagnoses.

I know some of you share it/them widely and others keep it a closely guarded secret. Your insight may help us understand other’s experiences and perhaps affect our own decisions.

The anonymous survey is repeated below. The original post with an intro is here: Survey: Do you have a Cover Diagnosis for your Dissociation Diagnosis?

THANK YOU!

How to respond to this survey

This is as anonymous as you need. Either post your responses here in a comment with your name/handle, or comment here and put “anonymous”, or send it to me in email at emilylonelygirl@gmail.com. Email is probably easiest – just cut-and-paste these questions into an email.

I will NOT share your email address or put your names in the survey results!

Thank you!

Survey for More than One Diagnosis

(Provide as much information as you like. If you don’t like a question, don’t answer it. Short quick answers are fine – but more detail will help us all learn.)

1. What dissociative disorder were you diagnosed with (dissociative amnesia/fugue, DDNOS, DID, polyfragmented DID)?

2. What is/are your other diagnosis(es)?

3. Do you share any of your diagnoses with friends and family? Yes/No

4. Please list which diagnoses do you share with friends/family (if any)

5. If you don’t share all diagnoses, which DON’T you share? Why not? Is it because one is more “acceptable” than the other?

6. If you have shared your dissociation diagnoses, how have people responded or treated you? Do you regret revealing?

7. If you revealed a dissociation diagnosis AND another diagnosis, was one better received than the other? Which? Why do you think?

8. How old are you?

9. Do you work?

10. Do you make medical claims for any/all of your diagnoses to an insurance plan offered by your employer?

11. Does your employer (not the insurance company) know any or all of your diagnoses? Which?

12. Have you ever been fired, or in any way been treated differently at work (e.g., job tasks changed) because they knew your diagnosis? How and for which diagnosis(es)?

13. Anything else you’d like to add or that I forgot to ask? Or advice you’d like to share? J

Thank you!

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2 Comments»

  davidrochester wrote @

1. What dissociative disorder were you diagnosed with (dissociative amnesia/fugue, DDNOS, DID, polyfragmented DID)? Polyfragmented DID

2. What is/are your other diagnosis(es)? PTSD and severe clinical depression.

3. Do you share any of your diagnoses with friends and family? Yes/No Yes.

4. Please list which diagnoses do you share with friends/family (if any) I have shared all of them, but not all with the same people. Some of my friends know I have DID; some don’t. Anyone who is close to me knows about at least one of the three diagnoses; unless someone is fairly close, however, or likely to be, there’s no reason to disclose.

5. If you don’t share all diagnoses, which DON’T you share? Why not? Is it because one is more “acceptable” than the other? I base my disclosures on the acceptance and awareness level of the person I’m talking to. For example, I was very comfortable talking about my DID diagnosis to a woman I knew very little, but who had a massive background in Jungian psychology, so the basic concepts of the fragmented self wouldn’t upset or confuse her. If I am talking to someone who has revealed a strong bias against counseling or therapy, I am unlikely to talk about my DID or PTSD diagnosis. I also know people with no psychological education at all, but who are creative and therefore tend to be more open-minded and imaginative, and they are excellent people for DID disclosure, because they have a higher level of imaginative empathy.

6. If you have shared your dissociation diagnoses, how have people responded or treated you? Do you regret revealing? I have never regretted it, though a couple of friends to whom I’ve disclosed it have become very curious and wanted to ask me a lot of questions, which is a good thing but also sometimes makes me feel a little bit like they’re identifying me too much as someone with DID, rather than just seeing me as David. However, that tended to go away after a month or so, after they felt that they had a better understanding of what DID means to me and how it works for me. Interestingly, two people I told had had past experiences with other friends who also had DID, which leads me to think that if multiples were more vocal, acceptance would become more widespread more quickly than we might think.

7. If you revealed a dissociation diagnosis AND another diagnosis, was one better received than the other? Which? Why do you think? A weird thing for me has been that the clinical depression diagnosis is usually the worst received, because I am not on meds for it, and refuse to be on them. Once I’ve explained DID pretty thoroughly, and explained that there is no effective pharmaceutical intervention for it, people are actually more comfortable with that than they are with what they perceive to be “untreated” depression. However, I am very good at explaining DID in a way that isn’t scary or threatening. In a couple of cases, I think I managed to give someone “DID envy,” which is … just plain funny. Many people who meet me are acquainted with my primary alter through my fiction writing, and most people who “meet” him that way are profoundly enchanted with him, so I have a particularly nice segue: “You know how you read that story and said you wished Jack were a real person? Well, he is … he’s just not always around.” And we go from there. 🙂

8. How old are you? 36

9. Do you work? Yes, I am self-employed in real estate sales.

10. Do you make medical claims for any/all of your diagnoses to an insurance plan offered by your employer? I have an excellent private health plan, but I would never make a mental health related claim, for fear of having the policy revoked or changed. I’ve had very bad past experience with insurance and other coverages being denied based on the fact that I used to be on antidepressants, so I’d never reveal something as widely-misunderstood as DID or PTSD to a faceless corporation.

11. Does your employer (not the insurance company) know any or all of your diagnoses? Which? Since I’m self-employed, it’s easy to keep my diagnoses quiet, since I have enough flexibility in my schedule to accommodate my mental health needs without making a “bad day” obvious.

12. Have you ever been fired, or in any way been treated differently at work (e.g., job tasks changed) because they knew your diagnosis? How and for which diagnosis(es)? No, but I would say that the way I do my job has changed hugely since I was diagnosed, and understood the importance of protecting alters who are strongly triggered by certain types of situations. I would say that some degree of employment autonomy is essential to anyone living with DID, otherwise the necessary task of self-parenting is too difficult.

  emilylonelygirl wrote @

David – thanks!!! Emily


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